Crossing the red sea

The Traditional Site with zero evidence There is a traditional route of the Exodus which has the children of Israel wading in shallow water through an area north of the Gulf of Suez while the tide was out.

Crossing the red sea

The Red Sea Crossing Introduction: We only know with certainty, three of the nearly 50 places listed in the exodus between Egypt and the Jordan 40 years later. God has chosen for us to know only the starting, midway and ending cities.

Nothing in between is known for certain. Additionally, of all the wilderness areas mentioned in the exodus, we only know for certain that the Wilderness of Shur was in Midian where Ishmael settled. We do not know for certain any of the following places: All these places are interdependent on each other.

The fact that there are over 15 different proposed sites for Mt. Sinai on three different continents proves this. In trying to locate the crossing point of the Red Sea, we need to follow closely what the Bible says.

Of course the actual crossing point needs to be possible, logical and harmonize with scripture. For example, crossing a shallow freshwater lake like the Bitter Lakes, where winds merely blew the water away, creates a problem for how the Egyptian army would be drowned.

On the other hand, a crossing through the center of either the Gulf of Suez or Gulf of Aqaba where the water is often meters deep, easily explains the drowning of the army, but creates a problem in actually getting one million men, women, children and livestock to negotiate the steep 60 degree downward slope to the bottom almost a mile deep, then back up the other equally steep side.

The date of the exodus was BC, in the 18th dynasty of Egypt, years before Solomon built the Temple: About 70 years later, Pharaoh Akhenaten - BC would arise and promote a monotheism that worshipped the sun god Aten.

All things considered, we are proposing that the Straits of Tiran in the Gulf of Aqaba, is the best candidate crossing point in BC. They took the long southern route, not the short eastern route via the Philistines: All northern crossing points on the Mediterranean sea like "Lake Sirbonis" are wrong because the Bible says they did not go the short route towards the Philistines, but the long route to the Red Sea: The gulf of Suez is called the Red Sea only once: These two lakes are suggested as possible traditional "Red Sea" crossing points.

Bitter Lakes and Lake Timsah are never called the Sea of Reeds but they are shallow lakes with reeds in them. But this is true of all shallow freshwater bodies in the region.

The True Location of the Red Sea Crossing

Red sea yam suph means: Calling the Red sea, the "Sea of reeds" is a guess based upon an inference of etymology. The same word is used of both freshwater bulrushes: So for those not content to call it just the Red Sea, they should be consistent and call it: Calling it "Sea of Reeds" creates a bias towards a freshwater body and causes us to rule out the Gulf of Aqaba.

Likewise calling the Red Sea "Sea of Seaweed" biases towards a saltwater body. Although the Gulf of Aqaba is the Red sea, we feel it best to just stick with what the Bible called it. The correct name therefore is "Red Sea".The Apostle Paul pointed out in 1 Corinthians that the Red Sea crossing was a representation of New Testament baptism.

Question for Reflection The God who parted the Red Sea provided for the Israelites in the desert, and raised Jesus Christ from the dead is the same God we worship today.

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The Red Sea was on one side of them, and here the Egyptians were coming from the other direction. But Jehovah put a cloud between his people and the Egyptians. So the Egyptians were not able to see the Israelites to attack them. The Crossing of the Red Sea (Hebrew: קריעת ים סוף Kriat Yam Suph – Crossing of the Red Sea or Sea of Reeds) is part of the biblical narrative of the Exodus, the escape of the Israelites, led by Moses, from the pursuing Egyptians in the Book of Exodus.

The Red Sea Crossing Site Found by Ron Wyatt The children of Israel lived in the Nile delta area or the land of Rameses, and first encamped at the northern end of .

Crossing the red sea

The Red Sea Crossing Site Found by Ron Wyatt The children of Israel lived in the Nile delta area or the land of Rameses, and first encamped at the northern end of the Gulf of Suez or Succoth at the beginning of the Exodus. The Red Sea Crossing. Introduction: We only know with certainty, three of the nearly 50 places listed in the exodus between Egypt and the Jordan 40 years later.

Suggest a Verse

Rameses (Goshen), Ezion-Geber (modern Elat) and Mt. Nemo. God has chosen for us to know only the starting, midway and ending cities.

Crossing the Red Sea - Bible Story Verses & Meaning