Concept analysis of empathy essay

This is the most controversial post I have ever written in ten years of blogging. I wrote it because I was very angry at a specific incident. Not meant as a criticism of feminism, so much as of a certain way of operationalizing feminism.

Concept analysis of empathy essay

Fact, Fiction, and Prediction, written by Jasia Reichardt[6] thus forging an unintended link to Ernst Jentsch 's concept of the uncanny[7] introduced in a essay entitled "On the Psychology of the Uncanny.

However, as the robot's appearance continues to become less distinguishable Concept analysis of empathy essay a human being, the emotional response becomes positive once again and approaches human-to-human empathy levels.

The name captures the idea that an almost human-looking robot seems overly "strange" to some human beings, produces a feeling of uncanninessand thus fails to evoke the empathic response required for productive human—robot interaction.

Concept analysis of empathy essay

Automatic, stimulus-driven appraisals of uncanny stimuli elicit aversion by activating an evolved cognitive mechanism for the avoidance of selecting mates with low fertilitypoor hormonal healthor ineffective immune systems based on visible features of the face and body that are predictive of those traits.

Uncanny stimuli may activate a cognitive mechanism that originally evolved to Concept analysis of empathy essay the avoidance of potential sources of pathogens by eliciting a disgust response.

Stimuli with human and nonhuman traits undermine our sense of human identity by linking qualitatively different categories, human and nonhuman, by a quantitative metric, degree of human likeness. The uncanny valley may "be symptomatic of entities that elicit a model of a human other but do not measure up to it".

However, if the entity looks almost human, it elicits our model of a human other and its detailed normative expectations. The nonhuman characteristics are noticeable, giving the human viewer a sense of strangeness. In other words, a robot stuck inside the uncanny valley is no longer judged by the standards of a robot doing a passable job at pretending to be human, but is instead judged by the standards of a human doing a terrible job at acting like a normal person.

This has been linked to perceptual uncertainty and the theory of predictive coding. The existence of artificial but humanlike entities is viewed by some as a threat to the concept of human identity.

Yalom explains that humans construct psychological defenses in order to avoid existential anxiety stemming from death. One of these defenses is specialness, the irrational belief that aging and death as central premises of life apply to all others but oneself. In folklore, the creation of human-like, but soulless, beings is often shown to be unwise, as with the golem in Judaism, whose absence of human empathy and spirit can lead to disaster, however good the intentions of its creator.

The negative effect associated with uncanny stimuli is produced by the activation of conflicting cognitive representations. Perceptual tension occurs when an individual perceives conflicting cues to category membership, such as when a humanoid figure moves like a robot, or has other visible robot features.

This cognitive conflict is experienced as psychological discomfort i. Mathur and Reichling found that the time subjects took to gauge a robot face's human- or mechanical-resemblance peaked for faces deepest in the uncanny valley, suggesting that perceptually classifying these faces as "human" or "robot" posed a greater cognitive challenge.

Burleigh and colleagues demonstrated that faces at the midpoint between human and non-human stimuli produced a level of reported eeriness that diverged from an otherwise linear model relating human-likeness to affect.

It has been argued that the effect is driven by categorization difficulty, [28] [29] perceptual mismatch, [32] [33] [34] frequency-based sensitization, [35] and inhibitory devaluation. Negative reactions toward very humanlike robots can be related to the challenge that this kind of robot leads to the categorical human — non-human distinction.

Kaplan [36] stated that these new machines challenge human uniqueness, pushing for a redefinition of humanness. MacDorman and Entenzari [37] investigated the distinction of human and robots as an individual trait that can predict sensitivity to the uncanny valley phenomenon. Ferrari, Paladino and Jetten [38] found that the increase of anthropomorphic appearance of a robot leads to an enhancement of threat to the human distinctiveness and identity.

The more a robot resembles a real person, the more it represents a challenge to our social identity as human beings. Research[ edit ] A series of studies experimentally investigated whether uncanny valley effects exist for static images of robot faces.

They asked subjects to explicitly rate the likability of each face. To measure trust toward each face, subjects completed a one-shot investment game to indirectly measure how much money they were willing to "wager" on a robot's trustworthiness.

Both stimulus sets showed a robust uncanny valley effect on explicitly-rated likability and a more context-dependent uncanny valley on implicitly-rated trust. Their exploratory analysis of one proposed mechanism for the uncanny valley, perceptual confusion at a category boundary, found that category confusion occurs in the uncanny valley but does not mediate the effect on social and emotional responses.

One study conducted in examined the evolutionary mechanism behind the aversion associated with the uncanny valley. A group of five monkeys were shown three images: The monkeys' eye-gaze was used as a proxy for preference or aversion.

As one would expect with the uncanny valley, more realism can lead to less positive reactions, and this study demonstrated that neither human-specific cognitive processes, nor human culture explain the uncanny valley.

In other words, this aversive reaction to realism can be said to be evolutionary in origin. The researchers say they saw, in essence, evidence of mismatch or perceptual conflict. What it seems to be doing is looking for its expectations to be met — for appearance and motion to be congruent.

The goal is to analyze how cross-modal factors of facial expression and speech can exaggerate the uncanny. A summary of Angela Tinwell's research on the uncanny valley, psychological reasons behind the uncanny valley and how designers may overcome the uncanny in human-like virtual characters is provided in her book, The Uncanny Valley in Games and Animation by CRC Press.

Design elements should match in human realism. A robot may look uncanny when human and nonhuman elements are mixed. In terms of performance, if a robot looks too appliance-like, people expect little from it; if it looks too human, people expect too much from it.

This likely operates at a sub-conscious level and may have a biological basis.Published: Thu, 04 Jan “A new moral principle is emerging which holds that the only authority deserving ones allegiance is that which is freely and knowingly granted by the led to the leader in response to, and in proportion to, the clearly evident servant stature of the leader.

Empathy and (Film) Fiction, by Alex Neill - Relations between sympathy-empathy expressiveness and fiction have become a significant issue in the debate on the emotional responses to the film fiction.

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We are now just past what I referred to as "the next decade" (in the original paper) wherein so much was/continues to be determined about how - and how soon - we begin this next age - or if we do - before the planet (otherwise) overhauls itself. Analysis of Mother Teresa’s Speech Mother Teresa.

Known as a pioneer, a peacemaker, and a legend. Mother Teresa or also known as “Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu” was a .

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The concept of empathy lies amid much confusion This analysis addresses that confusion using Walker and Avant's model of concept analysis, and looks at what empathy is is it trait or state, is it. Published: Mon, 5 Dec Introduction.

In the s, police needed to address public concern because of the tactics being used during interviewing, as more and more miscarriages of justice came to light.

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